Initiatives

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Initiating meaningful transformation necessitates coordinating in our particular communities on matters that have an effect on our rights, our possibilities and our existences. The Public Policy Institute for Justice COGIC, Inc., will champion a range of campaigns to strengthen constitutional principles under attack and to neutralize extremism. Commencing with combating in favor of a democratic system that functions for one and all to confronting assaults on equal rights, each and every one of our campaigns are directed at making advances toward a country where the promise of America is assessable for all Americans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil rights leaders and advocates jeopardized their existences for the right to vote. Nevertheless the Voting Rights Act of 1965, commonly considered the crown jewel of the movement, was eviscerated in 2013 in Shelby County v. Holder. That ruling unlocked the floodgates for a wide range of voter suppression actions devised to keep African Americans, Latinos, young people, the elderly and others from exercising the right to vote.

The Public Policy Institute for Justice will stand on the front lines of change, reinforcing voting rights legislation, driving back voter suppression, and building civic engagement with local leaders in communities across communities. Particularly as we head into the 2020 General Election, we must continue to fight to protect every American’s right to vote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Voter Registration

The Public Policy Institute for Justice, COGIC campaign to guard the vote of the people.

 

Get out the vote?

After a surge of voter interest and participation in 2008, vote suppression efforts across the country have been on the rise.

 

Shrinking the gap

The levels of participation by African-American, Hispanic and Asian voters all increased from 2004 to 2008, reducing the voter participation gap between minority and white voters

In 2004, the voter participation gap between White & African-American voters was 6.9%. In 2008 it was 0.9%.

2.1 million more African-American voters cast ballots in 2008 than in 2004. 15% more African-American voters cast ballots in 2008 than 2004.

2.1 million more Hispanic voters cast ballots in 2008 than 2004. 28% more Hispanic voters cast ballots in 2008 than 2004.

The increase

Enhanced minority voters resulted in exceptional diversity in the 2008 election. U.S. Census Bureau data show an escalation of approximately 5 million voters from 2004 to 2008.

The (anticipated) decrease

With new voter suppression laws in effect, an estimated 5 million eligible voters could be kept from registering and/or casting a ballot.

State outlook

The five states with the highest rates of voter turnout in 2008 were:

  1. Minnesota

  2. Wisconsin

  3. Maine

  4. New Hampshire

  5. Colorado

 

All 5 introduced voter suppression laws.

 

Voter suppression

 

After record voter turnout in 2008, more than 30 states introduced voter suppression legislation in 2011: 16 states passed such measures.

 

Voter registration

 

Barriers to voter registration make it harder for Americans to participate in our democracy.

Early Voting

 

Without early voting, voters who cannot make it to the polls on election day will not be able to vote.

 

Voter ID

 

Voter ID requirements limit the number of people who are able to cast a ballot.

 

Voter Registration

 

Barriers to voter registration will make it harder for Americans to participate in our democracy.

 

Thirteen states introduced bills that would:

  • End highly popular Election Day and same-day voter registration

  • Limit voter registration drives

  • Reduce opportunities for voters to register

 

Some examples:

  • Maine: Eliminate Election Day registration

  • Ohio: End period when voters could register and vote on the same day

  • Florida and Texas: Restrict voter registration drives

  • Florida and Wisconsin: Make it more difficult for people who move to stay registered and vote

 

Racial Breakdown

Census data shows that Hispanic and African-American voters are about twice as likely to register to vote through voter registration drives as white voters.

 

In 2008, 11.4% of African-American, 9.6% of Hispanic, and 5.4% of white voters used voter registration drives.

 

Early Voting

Without early voting, voters who cannot make it to the polls on Election Day will not be able to vote.

In 2011, ten states introduced bills that would reduce early or absentee voting periods; such bills PASSED in Florida, Georgia, Ohio, Tennessee and West Virginia.

In 2004 20% of ballots were cast before election day.

In 2008, 30% of ballots were cast before election day.

Early voting in 2008

African-American voters are much more likely to take advantage of early voting. In Florida and Georgia, high percentages of African-Americans voted in the early voting period.

In Florida 54% of African-Americans voted at early voting sites

 

In Georgia, 35% of African-Americans voted at early voting sites.

 

Voter ID

Voter ID requirements limit the number of voters who are able to cast a ballot.

Eight states passed voter ID laws in 2011: Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South

Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin.

 

Approximately 1 in 10 Americans do not have a government-issued photo ID.

 

Approximately 1 in 4 African-Americans do not have a government-issued photo ID.

 

Minority Voters at the State Level

 

In South Carolina, 81,938 minority voters lack government-issued ID; minority voers are 20 PERCENT MORE LIKELY to lack photo ID issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles than white voters.

Impact on Low-Income Voters

 

Fifteen percent of Americans who earn less than $35,000 a year do not have a government-issued photo ID.

 
 
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CENSUS 2020

 

Once every decade, the U.S. Census works to count every person living in the United States.  Every Michigander needs to be counted because census numbers have an effect on everyone in Michigan – including seniors, students, children, parents, businesses and our communities.

HOW TO COMPLETE THE CENSUS        

 

How To: If you haven't completed your 2020 Census yet, there are two ways to be counted.  Respond now at my2020census.gov or call 1-844-330-2020